Topical Antibiotic Foamix Offers Potential for New Acne Therapy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Foamix

David Domzalski
CEO of Foamix

FightAcne.com: What is the background for this study? How does FMX101 differ from other antibiotics for acne, ie tetracycline, topical clindamycin etc?

Response: This study measures the safety and efficacy of a topical foam formulation of the antibiotic minocycline, for the treatment of moderate-to-severe acne.

Minocycline is one of the most commonly used products for the treatment of acne, but is currently only available in an oral dosage form.

Significant side effects are associated with oral minocycline, including GI upset, photosensitivity, headaches, dizziness, and other potential effects on the CNS. In addition to the side effects associated with oral minocycline, many currently available topical acne medications contain ingredients which can be drying and irritating to the skin. These side effects can be frustrating to patients and potentially impact overall compliance to their treatment regimen. The study addresses important unmet needs in dermatology to determine whether a topical dosage form of minocycline may also be effective in treating acne without these side effects.

In all three of our Phase 3 clinical studies, >95% of facial local tolerability signs and symptoms were classified as “none” or “mild,” including dryness, erythema and itching. Also, our topical 4% minocycline foam, FMX101, is a natural triglyceride-based vehicle that does not contain surfactants or other ingredients that commonly serve as primary irritants. We believe that FMX101, if approved, would be the first topical minocycline available for the treatment of acne and provide a novel and much needed treatment option for patients who suffer from the physical and psycho-social effects of acne.

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Study Finds Chromophore Gel-Assisted Blue Light Phototherapy Improves Acne

This new study if a follow up of a study evaluating the KLOX BioPhotonic System, an LED blue light device using photo-converter chromophores, that demonstrated ” significantly improved moderate and severe facial acne vulgaris with an excellent safety profile”.

The current study extended the findings an additional 12 weeks and found ” The BioPhotonic System, which is comprised of LED blue light phototherapy and photo-converter chromophores, provides long-term efficacy and safety in the treatment of acne vulgaris, with a rate of compliance above what is generally observed in a young population of patients suffering from acne vulgaris, especially in light of sequential enrollment in a study treating one hemiface.”

 

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

Nikolis, A., Fauverghe, S., Scapagnini, G., Sotiriadis, D., Kontochristopoulos, G., Petridis, A., Rigopoulos, D., Dessinioti, C., Kalokasidis, K. and Antoniou, C. (2017), An extension of a multicenter, randomized, split-face clinical trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of chromophore gel-assisted blue light phototherapy for the treatment of acne. Int J Dermatol. doi:10.1111/ijd.13814

Possible Link Between Adolescent Acne and Later Life Prostate Cancer

A Swedish study found #that men with acne had a statistically signicant increased risk of prostate cancer later in life compared with men without acne”.  The link between the two may be the acne-associated bacteria Propionibacterium acnes.

Here is the link to the article:

Acne in Late Adolescence and Risk of Prostate Cancer
International Journal of Cancer

Study Finds Alcohol Intake Associated With Rosacea in Women

This study from the Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University finds “Alcohol intake was significantly associated with an increased risk of rosacea in women”.

J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 Jun;76(6):1061-1067.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2017.02.040. Epub 2017 Apr 20.

Alcohol intake and risk of rosacea in US women.

Li S1, Cho E2, Drucker AM3, Qureshi AA2, Li WQ4.

Pediatric Acne Microbiome Differs From Older Teens

‘The predominant bacteria in microbiome studies of adult acne is Propionibacterium, whereas in this pediatric population we saw a lot of Streptococcus bacteria. After treatment, the microbiomes of intervention group participants more closely resembled those of control group participants.’

 

Coughlin CC, Swink SM, Horwinski J, et al. The preadolescent acne microbiome: A prospective, randomized, pilot study investigating characterization and effects of acne therapy. Pediatr Dermatol. 2017;00:14. https://doi.org/10.1111/pde.13261

 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pde.13261/abstract?campaign=wolearlyview

Acne Affects Over 50% Of European Young Adults

A recent study finds that “the overall prevalence of self-reported acne was 57.8% and was highest in the 15- to 17-year-old age group” with heredity as the main risk factor for developing acne.

Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV

Acne Prevalence and Associations With Lifestyle: A Cross-Sectional Online Survey of Adolescents/Young Adults in 7 European Countries

J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2017 Sep 06;[EPub Ahead of Print], P Wolkenstein, A Machovcová, JC Szepietowski, D Tennstedt, S Veraldi, A Delarue

What Is Acne Keloidalis?

A keloid is a type of scar, that continues to grow and often itch, well after the underlying wound has healed.

Acne keloidalis is a type of scarring reaction most often seen on the nape of the neck or scalp.  Acne keloidalis may develop after a ‘close shave’ where the hairs have a chance to ingrow and cause inflammation and then scar.

Here’s a good case report:

Acne keloidalis nuchae: clinical and dermoscopic features

Chourouk ChoukNoureddine LitaiemMariem JonesFaten Zeglaoui
BMJ Case Reports 2017:published online 23 September 2017doi:10.1136/bcr-2017-222222

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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